Aurelien Levitan July 14 2017

There's a link you might want to click: TEN

Chainlink's new exhibition features Artworks by 10 LA based Artists: Alic Daniel, Matt DiGiacomo, Simon Haas, Kevin Lasting, Wyatt Mills, Kolbe Roper, Matthew Adam Ross, Johnny Smith & Aaron Wrinkle and a one-of-a-kind custom painted Linus bicycle by Gary Baseman

Lips and Teeth, the first exhibit at Chainlink featured Artwork by the gallery's Owner and curator. Images shot on Cheryl Lee Scott's iPhone 5, manipulated using Instagram's Layout and Blown-Up to 30 x 30  50 x 50 in. 

BJ produced and styled "Dark Depths of Devotion" one of the strongest stories in Zero with AJ English shot by Brian ButtlerBJ Panda Bear was the Fashion Editor of Damaged / Goods Magazine zero.

The Arts and Culture editor of Damaged / Goods Magazine, Irina Gusin met Cheryl at Art Basel November 2015. Irina kept telling me that I had to meet this really cool girl Cheryl that her and BJ had so much fun with. BJ Panda Bear who was the Fashion Editor of Damaged / Goods Magazine zero. 

I saw Cheryl again November,12 2016 at the opening of Let's Get Lost A collaboration by Andrew Kuykendall and Langley Fox Hemingway.

I met Chainlink's Founder, owner and curator Cheryl Lee Scott in December 2015. 

You can follow Cheryl Lee Scott on Instagram at @cherylleescott and Chainlink Gallery at @chainlinkgallery

 
Lips & Teeth, 2015 I blew these up to 30x30 & 50x50 inches

Lips & Teeth, 2015

I blew these up to 30x30 & 50x50 inches

Damaged: Can you please tell me about this one? Goods: This is as hi-res as they get because they were manipulated in Instagram Layout (before the zoom feature!) no post-production editing. This one is 'ChainlinkPS' 2015 it's my body with all of my jewelry designs around my neck & a Marimekko pillow

Damaged: Can you please tell me about this one?

Goods: This is as hi-res as they get because they were manipulated in Instagram Layout (before the zoom feature!) no post-production editing. This one is 'ChainlinkPS' 2015 it's my body with all of my jewelry designs around my neck & a Marimekko pillow

 
Uncommon Columns 2015 

Uncommon Columns 2015 

 
The Glare, 2015

The Glare, 2015

 
Cheryl Lee Scott, her daughter Kiki and her son Hayden shot by Josh Franklin at the opening of 'TEN'

Cheryl Lee Scott, her daughter Kiki and her son Hayden shot by Josh Franklin at the opening of 'TEN'

 
 
Flashback to the first opening @chainlinkgallery Friday November 13, 2015 💘 There's a link you want to click on: Flaunt

Flashback to the first opening @chainlinkgallery Friday November 13, 2015 💘 There's a link you want to click on: Flaunt

Damaged / Goods X Chainlink Gallery

 

Damaged / Goods: Cheryl, what sparked your interest in starting your own Gallery?

Cheryl Scott: I have always been a very creative person and I love art and supporting artists. I had some experience with collecting and one of my best friends is a successful artist. I felt having her as an advisor would give me valuable insight into the art world. It really happened on a whim. I originally intended to open a creative office space for myself, where I could make and sell jewelry that I design, and contemplate other ventures, perhaps even using the space as a storefront, but I truly had not thought ‘art gallery’ straight away. 

Damaged: How did you get started?

Cheryl: it was special in that it offers both retail and office use, while being in an ideal mid-city location. Two days after signing the lease I decided it had to be an art gallery, and seven weeks later I opened on Friday, November 13 2015 with an exhibition of my own work, large prints of digital photographic manipulations that I made on Instagram - many of them photographs of myself or my environments, highly distorted by using the Layout application. Since then I have curated nine exhibitions. The first year I showed only female artists, in response to my own personal life struggles of going through a divorce and being the mother of two very young children, and I took inspiration from an all-female exhibition at the Rubell Family Collection in Miami. I wanted to support other women. My main goal with Chainlink is to bring people together in real life, rather than just virtually. I really felt the need for people to connect in person, and the name of the business alludes to that. 

Damaged: How do you manage to curate Chainlink in addition to being a mother of two?

Cheryl: I am very fortunate to have a strong network of friends surrounding me to help, including my parents and my ex-husband. My kids, Kiki and Hayden are now five and six, so they go to school full-time. It’s sometimes difficult, I will admit. Our wonderful nanny Jenn got sick a few weeks before the ‘’TEN’ exhibition and I had several artist studio visits planned to make final selections for the show. I put the kids in the car and brought them with me. We all had a great couple of days, but it was exhausting!

Damaged: What does the future of Chainlink look like?

Cheryl: Ha! Isn’t that the million-dollar question? Running a gallery is not easy. The exhibitions have been very well-received and we have a great following. Every opening has been very festive and people love coming to see the work and meet old and new friends. It's definitely on the radar around town, but cultivating a collector-base in order to sustain the viability of the business takes a lot of effort and time. I am only one person with some part-time help here and there, and yes, I am also a mother, so I do have two jobs! I am actually in the process of deciding what I want the future to look like as we speak. I have a lot of talented artists in mind that I would like to share with the world. I will keep you posted!

Damaged: What is your ultimate goal with Chainlink?

Cheryl: I love bringing people together. When coming up with a name for my future business, although I had no idea it would be an art gallery, I went through a process of writing down words that had meaning to me. I design jewelry that looks like links or knots, I love the way the architect Frank Gehry has use chain link fence in his designs, and I feel it’s an under-appreciated material - it alludes to the gritty nature of an urban city setting, keeping people in but also keeping others out, which is not want I wanted to convey. I wanted it to be a symbol of connectivity in our highly fragmented world that is overrun with online social platforms that do not satiate our needs as human beings to connect in real life. So, I combined the words together and originally named it ChainlinkPS, the ‘PS’ meaning more to come. But, when the gallery came to life, I added the name Chainlink Gallery under the LLC. 

Damaged: Why Little Ethiopia? 

Cheryl: The location is so central, it's two miles from West Hollywood and even closer to Beverly Hills. Coincidentally LA County Museum of Art is just a 10 minute walk away. Fairfax Avenue has always been a busy and popular street for retail, it just felt right to be on this stretch and I've met many wonderful business owners, including my two neighbors who are also female. 

What's you damage?

Cheryl: I am a very passionate person and I fall for charming people very easily, whether they are lovers or friends, which also means I open myself up to a lot of heartache. But, I wouldn't have it any other way. I'd rather have a broken heart then feel nothing at all.

INSTAGRAM:

Art Work @cherylleescott with @chainlinkgallery
Photography @joshgfranklin
Words @aurelienlevitan
Interview DAMAGED / GOODS